Syatt Fitness: The Week In Review (9/6/2013)

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Good morning and happy Friday!

Things have been insanely hectic these past two weeks as I’ve begun my final semester of University and subsequently quadrupled my current workload.

Fortunately, I’m taking some great courses and am very lucky in that I have several outstanding professors. While, at this point, January seems light years away, I know this final semester is going to be over in a flash and I’ll miss college life more than I care to admit.

Come January I’ll be starting my full-time job as a strength coach at Total Performance Sports and couldn’t possibly be more excited. I’ll be starting around January 15th so if you’re located in the Boston area and  interested in 1-on-1 coaching shoot me an e-mail to jordan@syattfitness.com and we’ll set something up for the new year.

Anywho, I’ve got an outstanding collection of Strength Lesson’s and fitness articles from this past week so set some time aside this weekend to read and relax.

For those celebrating, L’Shana Tova (happy new year!) and have a great weekend,

-J

Daily Strength Lesson’s

Monday’s Strength Lesson: Too often we get caught up in the minutia of training (i.e. ridiculous exercise variations, complex periodization schemes, etc) and forget about the basic fundamentals.

As a result, progress may come to a standstill and we’ll have no clue how to single out the main culprit.

When designing a strength training program, keep it simple and make small changes over a long period of time. If you change everything at once you’ll have no idea what did/didn’t “work” and, consequently, will always be playing a guessing game.

Keep it simple and only make small adjustments when necessary.

And remember…”if it ain’t broken, don’t fix it.”

 

Tuesday’s Strength Lesson: Be passionate about your health…but don’t be morbid about it.

Passion about health and fitness (or anything for that matter) is amazing. So few people are truly passionate that – in one of those rare instances where it shines through – it’s one of the most inspiring and joyful things to be a part of.

Unfortunately, though, many in the health/fitness realm take passion to a point of morbidity. They are so “passionate” about their health that they put unrealistic and unfair expectations on those around them. Whether they realize it or not, they look down on others who don’t believe in the same fitness ideologies or follow the same type of lifestyle.

This, in my opinion, is extraordinarily sad.

By all means, be passionate about your health and well-being. Be passionate about EVERYONE’S health and well-being. Just understand that your way is not the only way nor is it necessarily the “right” way.

Passion is rare. Use it to build others up, not tear them down.

 

Wednesday’s Strength Lesson: The starting position of a Deadlift isn’t supposed to be comfortable. If yours is…you’re doing it wrong.

Prior to initiating the pull your body should be as tight as humanly possible – the more tension you create the stronger you’ll be.

Prior to initiating the pull you should get your chest up high and try to force your shoulders behind the bar while maintaining a neutral spine. Doing so will put you in the best/safest position for an efficient Deadlift.

Prior to initiating the pull you should try to spread the floor apart apart as hard as humanly possible – doing so will engage the ABductors, glute med, etc far more than normal.

Prior to initiating the pull you should take a massive breath of air and flex your abs as hard as you possibly can – this will protect the spine and simultaneously increase strength.

None of this is comfortable. It’s just proper DLing technique.

 

Thursday’s Strength Lesson: You can’t improve EVERYTHING at once. Learning to emphasize and improve one particular component at a time while maintaining others is an extraordinarily important skill set.

For me, my Bench rarely goes up when training my Squat/DL extremely heavy. That being the case, I cycle through brief periods of high intensity lower body/low(er) intensity upper body and low(er) intensity lower body/high intensity upper body.

Through cycling periods of intensity this way I can continuously improve both upper and lower body lifts with little-to-no periods of stagnation.

Learn to emphasize and improve one particular component at a time while giving others a bit of a rest. It’s difficult in the short-term (patience wise) but your strength will skyrocket int he long-run.

 

Friday’s Strength Lesson: “When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.”

 

Recommended Reading

  1. Training After an All-Night Fast Does NOT Promote Weight Loss via Brad Schoenfeld
  2. 8 Strategies for Maintaining Strength via Eric Cressey
  3. How to Lose Weight via Armi Legge
  4. Youth Hockey Training: The Truth About Resistance Training via Kevin Neeld
  5. 3 Tips to Make Your Stretching More Effective via Bret Contreras
  6. The Weight on the Barbell Is Important – Not the Scale via Nia Shanks
  7. Metabolically Healthy Women Have Same CVD Risk Regardless of BMI via Medical News Today
  8. 5 Killer Conditioning Drills – How to Build Muscle via Jason Ferruggia
  9. Is a Low Carb Diet Bad For Your Thyroid? via Anthony Colpo
  10. Exercises for Building a Bigger Back via Jason Ferruggia
  11. Optimizing Strength Training for Endurance Performance via Brad Schoenfeld
  12. Training the Aging Athlete via Mike Robertson
  13. Isometric Contractions, Trigger Points, and Muscle Energy Techniques via Mike Reinold
  14. Intense Exercise – Why and How via Precision Nutrition
  15. Unapologetically Debunking the Top 7 Exercise Myths via Lee Boyce